Irregular and eclectic micro-cinema events in Amsterdam; screening under-represented cult classics, energetic contemporary video shorts, off-beat animation and lost movies of the global underground. Non-profit artist-run. All rights reserved. All wrongs reversed.

Upcoming films:
Tuesday 22 June
Sans Soleil 100' dir. Chris Marker 1983 France
Dial H-I-S-T-O-R-Y 68' dir. Johan Grimonprez 1997 Belgium


The guiding visual thread of the piece is the almost exhaustive chronology of airplane highjackings in the world. The soundtrack is constituted of a fictive narrative inspired by two Don DeLillo novels White Noise and Mao II which, for Grimonprez, highlight the value of the spectacular in our catastrophe culture. - http://www.medienkunstnetz.de/works/dial-history/

One connection or reflection in the movie becomes four or five in your mind as you watch Sans soleil or think about it afterwards, as if the filmmaker has sent you on a mission to find out this or that idea or bit of information (the movie is inspirational in a very concrete sense), or to consider something from a different perspective, and still another, and so on; the cinematic equivalent of a stone being thrown into a pond, wherein you are the pond. All this, and Marker still finds room for a melancholy, weary, yet strangely optimistic, exhilarating emotional texture. It also happens to be very funny at times. - http://archive.sensesofcinema.com/contents/directors/02/marker.html

Bar at 20:00. Starts: 20:30 hrs
Nightly membership: 4 Euro
Presented and produced by Emile Zile
OT301 / Overtoom 301 / 1054 HW Amsterdam

Facebook? http://www.facebook.com/pages/Amsterdam-Netherlands/Electric-Cinema-Amsterdam/445039395053?ref=ts The Electric Cinema Logo Device was made by Pinar + Viola


View Larger Map

Tuesday 8 June 2010 (the april program returns, post-volcanic interruption)
Final Flesh 90' dir. Vernon Chatman 2009 U.S.A.
House 88' dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi 1977 Japan

From the creator of Xavier: Renegade Angel and Wonder Showzen, Final Flesh - a feature film made by commercial porn companies commissioned to visualise the sexual fantasies of the client. This movie replaces the sex with metaphysical dialogue, cum shots with cold meat, intercourse with brain-damaged philosophy. A murky, awkward trip to suburban fantasies, existentialist longing for meaning and antibacterial hand cream.
The second film on the bill is an optically intense, Japanese teen-comedy ghost film 'House', Dario Argento circa Suspiria meets Sound of Music on acid. Beware of singing watermelons and carnivorous pianos.

Tuesday 18 May 2010
Tribulation 99 dir. Craig Baldwin U.S.A. 1992
F is for Fake dir. Orson Welles U.S.A. 1974

TWO FAUX-DOCUMENTARIES ON THE TOPIC OF AUTHENTICITY, MYTH MAKING, ALTERNATE HISTORIES AND CREATIVE CONSPIRACY.

F for Fake: This is the Welles movie that people seem to discover on their own, perhaps by accident, and after the discovery, they cannot contain their enthusiasm. A friend of mine recently saw it for the first time, and declared it: 'Cinema, Cinema, Cinema!' The project originated as a François Reichenbach documentary on the great art forger Elmyr de Hory, who was being profiled for a biography by Clifford Irving. When an unexpected turn of events revealed that Irving was as much of a trickster as Elmyr (whose name becomes a mantra throughout the film), Welles, who was on the Spanish island of Ibiza at the time, took over the project and created a rather intricate model of the film-essay. The subject, ostensibly, is fakery, but the French title (Vérités et mensonges, which in English means 'Truths and lies') might dissuade one from approaching the work as being merely a sensationalistic exposé of forgers and charlatans; what emerges is a thoughtful, sometimes sad, sometimes hilarious meditation not just on that subject but also on Welles' life, his career, and the cinema. - Jaime N. Christley, Senses of Cinema, http://archive.sensesofcinema.com/contents/directors/03/welles.html

Tribulation 99: The film's full title, Tribulation 99: Alien Anomalies Under America – the Shocking Truth About the Coming Apocalypse, pretty much tells it all. Whereas the situation in the Congo appealed to Baldwin politically and socially, the events in Tribulation are manufactured almost entirely from the source material. In fact, the filmmaker likens the process of creating a film like Tribulation to an excavation. It is the retrieval of film-objects from the archives he maintains that lead to the film's creation, not any script-writing or brainstorming process. It can take years to sort out the footage until a Tribulation seems to form itself out of the connections. Baldwin's archive is not extensive. He claims it has only about 2500 film units. This may seem like quite a few, but compared to the stock footage company run by his friend Rick Prelinger, (8) Baldwin's collection seems small. Naturally, the development of a film like Tribulation starts with Baldwin's taste in film, which leans towards B-movies, science fiction and ethnographic films. But the associative connections he draws in the trance-like state of poring through old footage is what gives Tribulation its form as well as its highly allegorical content. Every cut in a Craig Baldwin film is based on some kind of association or metaphor, and it is only when dozens, maybe hundreds of these metaphors come together that the shape of the film becomes apparent. - Tim Maloney, Senses of Cinema http://archive.sensesofcinema.com/contents/directors/06/baldwin.html

- APRIL PROGRAM CANCELLED DUE TO ICELANDIC GODS OF VULKAN -

Tuesday 16 March 2010
Woodenhead 90' dir. Florian Habicht 2003 New Zealand
A Grimm musical fairytale that takes a Hansel-and-Gretel like journey through New Zealand's towns, bush and forests.

"Kiwi-accented refugees from a kitsch European carnival world stutter, sing and lollop their way around a New Zealand landscape of almost ethereal, black and white beauty. There are moments Fellini might have envied when Habicht's carnival beings and his landscape coalesce in 'sad, strange and beautiful' florescence." -Bill Gosden

"A truly unsettling, visually inventive, stylistically thrilling and quite marvellous diamond in the rough." -James Hewison MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

"This country has never looked so sensual, its people so damp with lust." -Chris Knox REAL GROOVE MAGAZINE

Tuesday 16 February 2010
aka Funky Forest First Contact 150' dir. Katsuhito Ishii 2005
IKU 90' dir. Shu Lea Cheang 2000

Two films from Japan: the surreal and manic Funky Forest First Contact and stylised soft porn post-Bladerunner scifi I.K.U.

excerpted from Film Comment Vol.42 No.6, New York, 2006 "This circuitous introduction now drops us in a cinematic terrain where music, comedy and anime govern the atmosphere and breed unclassifiable plants. Let's call it a film: Funky Forest: The First Contact (2005). You'll want a description - but I'll give you a mask. Let's say it's a disenchanted young guy drifting in a space pod, flipping channels and grazing the cut-up mediascape of manzai gags, routines, songs, tracks and dances which momentarily attract him." - Philip Brophy

allmovie.com: "Taiwanese-born experimental filmmaker Shu Lea Cheang directs this dizzying computer-enhanced sci-fi cyber-porn flick. A pun that roughly translates from Japanese as "I'm coming!", the title aptly sets the film's orgasmic tone. The story, as such, revolves around the GENOM Corporation, which has started mass-producing sexbots for the lofty purpose of bettering humankind's sexual development. Reiko (Tokitoh Ayumu) is one such cyborg; her body being one giant "Gen-XXX IKU Coder" hard drive, she is burdened with the task of collecting "orgasm data" by shagging everything that moves. Set against some brilliantly bizarre digitally-animated set pieces, the film's characters couple, triple, and so forth with remarkable indifference to gender, species, or physiological make-up."

Sunday January 24 2010
Liquid Sky (1982) 112' dir. Slava Tsukerman USSR/USA

Electric Cinema: a new screening night in Amsterdam kicking off with the Heroin-Orgasm-Alien sex-fuelled New York new wave classic 'Liquid Sky'. Androgynous models, Sleazy art school tutors, UFO visitations, puritanical underground scenesters and more...

Directed by Soviet Union emigre Slava Tsukerman in 1982 and co-written by his wife Nina V. Kerova, 'Liquid Sky' is a hyper-stylised cliche of a New York hipster scene of the early 80's. A bold example of the innovative feature films to emerge from that period, a prime candidate for the Electric Cinema debut screening.

http://kinofist.blogspot.com/2008/02/elective-affinities.html

Screens alongside a serving of intense and unrelenting optical videos by New York based video artist Yoshi Sodeoka.